• New California Rare Earth Facility Ramping Up Production

    After more than three years of design, engineering, construction, and commissioning, Molycorp's new, state-of-the-art rare earth processing facility at Mountain Pass, California is fully operational and is now ramping up production of rare earth materials for customers around the globe. This complex is one of the world's most technologically advanced, energy efficient and environmentally progressive rare earth facilities. It sets a new standard for the production of rare earths with less impact on the environment.

    published: 30 Jun 2014
  • National Security, Rare Earth Elements & The Thorium Problem

    "The only operating rare earth mine in the United States sends all of their valuable resources to China for processing. Congress does not know this. They think this [mining] company is supplying the U.S. value chain, [and] is supplying the military. It is in-fact, the opposite. They are part of the Chinese monopoly. They're taking powder and shipping it to China, and it comes back as a magnet, or an alloy, or a bolt-on component." - Jim Kennedy To address this issue, contact your legislators to support H.R.4883 https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 Why can't Molycorp, Lynas or any other 'western' rare earth company succeed? China's production and market advantage in Rare Earth Elements (REE) is largely the result of NRC and IAEA "Source Material" regulations with unintende...

    published: 28 Jul 2014
  • Insight: Rare–earth metals

    Did you know the smooth running of almost every piece of technology you use - is down to something called a rare-earth metal? The Insight team ask why a monopolised market is causing global concern. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7fWeaHhqgM4Ry-RMpM2YYw?sub_confirmation=1 Livestream: http://www.youtube.com/c/trtworld/live Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTWorld Twitter: https://twitter.com/TRTWorld Visit our website: http://www.trtworld.com/

    published: 12 Oct 2016
  • Rare Earth Minerals Turn Villages to Ruins

    Follow us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/cnforbiddennews Like us on FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/chinaforbiddennews Baotou, Inner Mongolia is China's largest rare earth mineral production base. Although it is a precious mineral resource, rare earth imposes great dangers of pollution. Recently, French media reported from Baotou. Entitled "In China, rare earths are killing villages", the report highlighted massive environmental pollution. It revealed the impact of the production of rare earth minerals on local residents, animals and land. The following is our report. French media 'Le Monde' reported from Baotou, stating that by aerial viewpoint, it looks like a large lake, fed by numerous tributaries. On site, it is actually an opaque discharge covering an area of 10 km2. Surroundin...

    published: 26 Jul 2012
  • Baotou toxic lake

    A visit to the artificial lake in Baotou in Inner Mongolia - the dumping ground for radioactive, toxic waste from the city’s rare earth mineral refineries. The byproduct of creating materials used to do everything from make magnets for wind turbines to polishing iPhones to make them nice and shiny. Full story here: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150402-the-worst-place-on-earth Watch as Unknown Fields expedition leader Liam Young collects a sample of toxic clay to use in a forthcoming art project... To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email licensing@storyful.com

    published: 08 Aug 2014
  • China's rare earth monopoly

    Rare earth metals are a collection of 17 chemical elements that are key to the production of a long list of modern-day technologies. Despite their name, the elements are relatively plentiful in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical properties, the elements are not often found in concentrated forms that are economically viable to extract. Mining them is not only complex but costly, so many countries are cautious. China produces more than 95 per cent of the elements for the world's technology industry. The rest is supplied by the US, Estonia, India, Malaysia and Brazil. That may change, however, as demand for rare-earth metals rises for use in products such as smartphones, electric and hybrid cars, common computer monitors and televisions. Al Jazeera's Melissa ...

    published: 21 Nov 2010
  • Rare Earth Mining

    VOA's Philip Alexiou talks with the President and CEO of Avalon Rare Metals who recently visited the New York Stock Exchange. Don Bubar who leads the Toronto based company talks about the kinds of rare earth metals Avalon will focus on and how China's rare earth supply policy is affecting the metals and minerals market.

    published: 06 May 2011
  • Why We Need Rare Earth Elements

    Rare earth elements are crucial to the technology around us - they're in phones, computers, tvs, and hybrid cars. Why are they so important? Any why are they so difficult to mine? Anthony takes a look. Read More: "Japan finds rich rare earth deposits on seabed" http://uk.news.yahoo.com/japan-finds-rich-rare-earth-deposits-seabed-114659686.html#SvZ1Dq2 "Japanese researchers said Thursday they have found a rich deposit of rare earths on the Pacific seabed, with reports suggesting it could be up to 30 times more concentrated than Chinese reserves." "4 Rare Earth Elements That Will Only Get More Important" http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/engineering/news/important-rare-earth-elements#slide-1 "Lithium is lionized. Silicon has a whole valley named after it. But what about the ...

    published: 26 Mar 2013
  • WoW! $1 Trillion Trove of 'Rare Minerals' Revealed Under Afghanistan!

    http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Despite being one of the poorest nations in the world, Afghanistan may be sitting on one of the richest troves of minerals in the world, valued at nearly $1 trillion, according to U.S. scientists. Afghanistan, a country nearly the size of Texas, is loaded with minerals deposited by the violent collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began inspecting what mineral resources Afghanistan had after U.S.-led forces drove the Taliban from power in the country in 2004. As it turns out, the Afghanistan Geological Survey staff had kept Soviet geological maps and reports up to 50 years old or more that hinted at a geological gold mine. http://news.yahoo.com/1-trillion-trove-rare-minerals-revealed-under-afghanistan-1145202...

    published: 06 Sep 2014
  • 13 Rarest Gemstones and Minerals Ever Seen

    Here are the 13 most rare and valuable gemstones and minerals ever seen in the world like the blye Benitoite and red diamonds! Subscribe for new videos Monday Wednesday and Friday! 8. Jeremejevite This mineral was discovered way back in 1883 by a French mineralogist named Augustin Alexis Damour, who named it after the Russian scientist Pavel Vladimirovich Eremeev. The crystal was found on Mt. Soktui in Siberia, Russia. Since then, it has been described as being found in the Eifel District of Germany and in the Pamir Mountains in Namibia. This rare aluminum borate mineral is comprised of variable hydroxide and fluoride ions. 7. Poudretteite This mineral was first found during the mid-1960’s in the Poudrette quarry of Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec. However, it wasn’t until 1987 that the...

    published: 05 Oct 2016
  • Rare Earth Elements

    Hank reveals why our love affair with the rare earth elements has a dark side. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References: http://washingtonindependent.com/101462/california-mine-represents-hope-... http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/09/business/energy-environment/09rare.htm... http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/rare_earths/

    published: 28 Feb 2012
  • Iridium - The MOST RARE Metal on Earth!

    Chemical Elements: http://www.ebay.com /usr/novaelementscom?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 NOVAELEMENTS: https://www.novaelements.com/ Mel Science chemical sets: https://goo.gl/SxwFlQ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Thoisoi?ty=h Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thoisoi2 Interesting page about chemical experiments: http://m.chemicum.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thoisoi/ So today I will tell you about the most rare metal on Earth - iridium. Iridium is a transitional metal, which is located in the middle of the periodic table, below rhodium. If we take a look at the prevalence of all elements in the earth's crust, Iridium holds the last place, that is a billion atoms of all that there is and only one atom of iridium. This metal is 40 times rarer than gold. In much higher concentrati...

    published: 10 Dec 2016
  • China's Monopoly on Rare Earth Minerals to Diminish

    For more news visit ☛ http://english.ntdtv.com Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://facebook.com/NTDTelevision China currently produces the vast majority of the worlds rare-earth minerals - a group of 17 elements essential for a range of modern technology. However, China's monopoly on supply of these minerals could be about to change. China's current monopoly as a supplier of rare-earth metals is likely to change in the next couple of years, according to a new report, with new rare-earth mines opening in Western Australia and California. For years, China has produced at least 90 percent of rare earth metals and restricted exports, driving prices even higher. Some Japanese companies have moved to China to ensure supply of rare earth ...

    published: 17 Aug 2011
  • Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble

    Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble

    published: 14 Dec 2010
  • Increasing Scarcity of Earth's Rare Materials

    According to studies that factored the percentage of a material in the Earth's crust and the importance it has to modern society, rhodium is among the rarest elements, along with gold, platinum and tellurium. One estimated projection from China, which produces over 90 percent of the world's rare earth metals, says that their mines for metals like platinum will not be able to keep up with demand in 15 years, and silver demand will overcome supply in 20 years. Have you ever wondered what the rarest material in the world is? According to studies that factored the percentage of a material in the Earth's crust and the importance it has to modern society, rhodium is among the rarest elements, along with gold, platinum and tellurium. One estimated projection from China, which produces over...

    published: 20 Mar 2014
  • 60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

    On March 22, 2015, 60 Minutes featured a segment on the importance of rare earth elements and underscored the need to ensure a domestic supply chain of these critical minerals moving forward.

    published: 23 Mar 2015
New California Rare Earth Facility Ramping Up Production

New California Rare Earth Facility Ramping Up Production

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:03
  • Updated: 30 Jun 2014
  • views: 21479
videos
After more than three years of design, engineering, construction, and commissioning, Molycorp's new, state-of-the-art rare earth processing facility at Mountain Pass, California is fully operational and is now ramping up production of rare earth materials for customers around the globe. This complex is one of the world's most technologically advanced, energy efficient and environmentally progressive rare earth facilities. It sets a new standard for the production of rare earths with less impact on the environment.
https://wn.com/New_California_Rare_Earth_Facility_Ramping_Up_Production
National Security, Rare Earth Elements & The Thorium Problem

National Security, Rare Earth Elements & The Thorium Problem

  • Order:
  • Duration: 23:00
  • Updated: 28 Jul 2014
  • views: 29323
videos
"The only operating rare earth mine in the United States sends all of their valuable resources to China for processing. Congress does not know this. They think this [mining] company is supplying the U.S. value chain, [and] is supplying the military. It is in-fact, the opposite. They are part of the Chinese monopoly. They're taking powder and shipping it to China, and it comes back as a magnet, or an alloy, or a bolt-on component." - Jim Kennedy To address this issue, contact your legislators to support H.R.4883 https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 Why can't Molycorp, Lynas or any other 'western' rare earth company succeed? China's production and market advantage in Rare Earth Elements (REE) is largely the result of NRC and IAEA "Source Material" regulations with unintended consequences. Source Material: Materials containing any ratio or combination of Thorium and Uranium above .05%. Producing or holding these materials within the regulatory threshold (.05%) requires extensive and wide-ranging licensing, storage, transportation, remediation disposal and compliance costs, including prohibitive liability and bonding issues. Consequently any potential supplier of byproduct / co-product rare earth resources that would be designated as "source material' disposes of these valuable resources to avoid liability and compliance issues. NRC / IAEA regulations regarding "Source Material" played a key roll in undermining the economic viability of all 'western' rare earth producers and are a critical factor in China's current 'market advantage'. Producers like Molycorp and Lynas, with low Thorium deposits, can never compete with China. Resources are abundant and available: U.S mining companies currently mine as much as 50% of global Rare Earth Elements demand every year. But these resources are diverted in tailings lakes or are redistributed back into the host ore body, due to NRC and IAEA regulations defining Monazite and other Thorium bearing rare earth resources as "Source Material". H.R. 4883 would solve the "Thorium Problem" by creating a federally chartered multinational Thorium Energy and Industrial Products Corporation ("Thorium Bank"). Privately funded and operated, this would decouple thorium from rare earth production. The Thorium Corporation would also have Congressional Authority to develop Thorium energy systems and industrial products. Environmental regulations are not scaled back... rather this enables thorium to be stored safely & securely, rather then being treated as "waste". https://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/hr4883 H.R. 4883 thus also addresses the U.S. Weapons Systems current 100% Dependency on China for Rare Earths. http://thoriumenergyalliance.com/downloads/TEAC6/USWeaponsChinese.pdf Federal Legislation governing Strategic Materials, 10 USC 2533b, does not specify rare earths, but includes metal alloys containing limited amounts of manganese, silicon, copper, or aluminum, chromium, cobalt, columbium, molybdenum, nickel, titanium, tungsten, vanadium, nickel and iron-nickel, cobalt, Titanium and Zirconium alloys. Federal Regulations require that these materials be melted in the U.S. Most of these materials are utilized in rare earth alloys, magnets and components in the defense industry. The bill does NOT reclassify thorium. It does NOT alter current environmental protection. It simply resolves "The Thorium Problem" which cripples United States domestic rare earth mining, processing and value-adding processes. Source Footage: Jim Kennedy @ IAEA: http://youtu.be/fLR39sT_bTs Jim Kennedy interview @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/Dih30mUexrA Jim Kennedy Talk @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/CARlEac1iuA Stephen Boyd @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/z7qfOnMzP9Y Stephen Boyd @ TEAC4: http://youtu.be/J16IpITWBQ8 John Kutsch @ TEAC6: http://youtu.be/MgRn4g7a068
https://wn.com/National_Security,_Rare_Earth_Elements_The_Thorium_Problem
Insight: Rare–earth metals

Insight: Rare–earth metals

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:19
  • Updated: 12 Oct 2016
  • views: 1283
videos
Did you know the smooth running of almost every piece of technology you use - is down to something called a rare-earth metal? The Insight team ask why a monopolised market is causing global concern. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7fWeaHhqgM4Ry-RMpM2YYw?sub_confirmation=1 Livestream: http://www.youtube.com/c/trtworld/live Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TRTWorld Twitter: https://twitter.com/TRTWorld Visit our website: http://www.trtworld.com/
https://wn.com/Insight_Rare–Earth_Metals
Rare Earth Minerals Turn Villages to Ruins

Rare Earth Minerals Turn Villages to Ruins

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:09
  • Updated: 26 Jul 2012
  • views: 20842
videos
Follow us on TWITTER: http://twitter.com/cnforbiddennews Like us on FACEBOOK: http://www.facebook.com/chinaforbiddennews Baotou, Inner Mongolia is China's largest rare earth mineral production base. Although it is a precious mineral resource, rare earth imposes great dangers of pollution. Recently, French media reported from Baotou. Entitled "In China, rare earths are killing villages", the report highlighted massive environmental pollution. It revealed the impact of the production of rare earth minerals on local residents, animals and land. The following is our report. French media 'Le Monde' reported from Baotou, stating that by aerial viewpoint, it looks like a large lake, fed by numerous tributaries. On site, it is actually an opaque discharge covering an area of 10 km2. Surrounding the industrial plants producing 17 minerals are reject waste waters loaded with chemicals. There are no fish or algae The Le Monde article introduced that rock from Bayan obo rare earth ore mine, located 120 kilometers away, are sent here for treatment. The concentration of rare earth in the rocks is very low and must be separated and purified by hydrometallurgical processes and acid baths. In the effluent basin are exist all sorts of toxic chemicals and radioactive elements such as thorium. Ingestion of these toxins causes cancer of the pancreas, lung and blood. A pungent odor exudes within radius of 10 miles. Local villagers have been suffering from cancer. Rows of brown houses in the village have been reduced to rubble. Sichuan environmentalist Chen Yunfei indicates that rare earth refining process causes great environmental pollution and destruction. People are unaware of the specific dangers of this project, and the specialists involved in the decision-making. Chen Yunfei: "Some officials only work on the image projects for profit. They relocate once the money has been made. Some officials collude with the business, caring about nothing but profit, leaving the mess for the public." According to local residents, Baotou used to be a vast grassland. In 1958 the state enterprise Baotou Iron and Steel Company began producing rare earth production. By the end of 1980, locals found that the plant was in trouble. Last year, China Environment News reported that Baotou Iron and Steel Group's tailing dam leakage has caused damage to five surrounding villages. It has affected more than 3000 farmers, and ruined more than 3,295 Acres of farmland. Ma Peng, former Director of the Baotou Rare Earth Research Institute, indicated that due to the lack of a barrier below the tailing dam, the mining waste is directly discharging into the Yellow River. The discharge is at a rate of 300m per year. The residents also said that further pollution has been caused by other industries and thermal power plants. These industries followed rare earth production by the Baotou Iron and Steel Company. Local residents have to breathe air saturated with sulfuric acid and coal dust. Coal dust is airbourne around the houses. Cows, horses, chickens and goats are being killed by these poisons. The locals have fled, and Xinguang Sancun village has now decreased from 2000 villagers to 300. Every family is hit with illness. After 20 years of complaints to the local government, the villagers have finally won promises of financial compensation. These have only been partially fulfilled. Miss Hao, a resident of Baotou: "We all know. The government is too dark. No one cares about the people, whether they live or die, not to mention the pollution." For many years, there have been calls for attention for the issue of Baotou tailing dam discharging thorium radiation to Baotou and into the Yellow River. The hazards and pollution caused by the Baotou tailing dam have never been effectively alleviated. Environmentalist Chen Yunfei: "This is an investment that has hurt several generations. It has polluted the whole environment. This high cost investment ought to be condemned. Our future generations are going to suffer for it." China Environment News indicated that Baotou is located in the stratum fracture zone. In the event of a major earthquake or large-scale rainfall, the rupture of the tailing dam will threaten the surrounding five villages, as well as tens of thousands of lives of the Baotou Iron and Steel workers. If the tailings flow into the Yellow River, it will cause serious pollution to the river. 《神韵》2011世界巡演新亮点 http://www.ShenYunPerformingArts.org/
https://wn.com/Rare_Earth_Minerals_Turn_Villages_To_Ruins
Baotou toxic lake

Baotou toxic lake

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:54
  • Updated: 08 Aug 2014
  • views: 349861
videos
A visit to the artificial lake in Baotou in Inner Mongolia - the dumping ground for radioactive, toxic waste from the city’s rare earth mineral refineries. The byproduct of creating materials used to do everything from make magnets for wind turbines to polishing iPhones to make them nice and shiny. Full story here: http://www.bbc.com/future/story/20150402-the-worst-place-on-earth Watch as Unknown Fields expedition leader Liam Young collects a sample of toxic clay to use in a forthcoming art project... To use this video in a commercial player or in broadcasts, please email licensing@storyful.com
https://wn.com/Baotou_Toxic_Lake
China's rare earth monopoly

China's rare earth monopoly

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:41
  • Updated: 21 Nov 2010
  • views: 23275
videos
Rare earth metals are a collection of 17 chemical elements that are key to the production of a long list of modern-day technologies. Despite their name, the elements are relatively plentiful in the earth's crust. However, because of their geochemical properties, the elements are not often found in concentrated forms that are economically viable to extract. Mining them is not only complex but costly, so many countries are cautious. China produces more than 95 per cent of the elements for the world's technology industry. The rest is supplied by the US, Estonia, India, Malaysia and Brazil. That may change, however, as demand for rare-earth metals rises for use in products such as smartphones, electric and hybrid cars, common computer monitors and televisions. Al Jazeera's Melissa Chan, reporting from Baotou in China, examines the importance of these elements.
https://wn.com/China's_Rare_Earth_Monopoly
Rare Earth Mining

Rare Earth Mining

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:13
  • Updated: 06 May 2011
  • views: 11090
videos
VOA's Philip Alexiou talks with the President and CEO of Avalon Rare Metals who recently visited the New York Stock Exchange. Don Bubar who leads the Toronto based company talks about the kinds of rare earth metals Avalon will focus on and how China's rare earth supply policy is affecting the metals and minerals market.
https://wn.com/Rare_Earth_Mining
Why We Need Rare Earth Elements

Why We Need Rare Earth Elements

  • Order:
  • Duration: 3:18
  • Updated: 26 Mar 2013
  • views: 68360
videos
Rare earth elements are crucial to the technology around us - they're in phones, computers, tvs, and hybrid cars. Why are they so important? Any why are they so difficult to mine? Anthony takes a look. Read More: "Japan finds rich rare earth deposits on seabed" http://uk.news.yahoo.com/japan-finds-rich-rare-earth-deposits-seabed-114659686.html#SvZ1Dq2 "Japanese researchers said Thursday they have found a rich deposit of rare earths on the Pacific seabed, with reports suggesting it could be up to 30 times more concentrated than Chinese reserves." "4 Rare Earth Elements That Will Only Get More Important" http://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/engineering/news/important-rare-earth-elements#slide-1 "Lithium is lionized. Silicon has a whole valley named after it. But what about the silent heroes of modern technology?" "What are 'rare earths' used for?" http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-17357863 ""Rare earths" are a group of 17 chemically similar elements crucial to the manufacture of many hi-tech products." DNews is a show about the science of everyday life. We post two new videos every day of the week. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter https://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter: https://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter https://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter https://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://www.facebook.com/DNews DNews Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/106194964544004197170/posts DNews Website http://discoverynews.com/
https://wn.com/Why_We_Need_Rare_Earth_Elements
WoW! $1 Trillion Trove of 'Rare Minerals' Revealed Under Afghanistan!

WoW! $1 Trillion Trove of 'Rare Minerals' Revealed Under Afghanistan!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 2:46
  • Updated: 06 Sep 2014
  • views: 22083
videos
http://www.undergroundworldnews.com Despite being one of the poorest nations in the world, Afghanistan may be sitting on one of the richest troves of minerals in the world, valued at nearly $1 trillion, according to U.S. scientists. Afghanistan, a country nearly the size of Texas, is loaded with minerals deposited by the violent collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) began inspecting what mineral resources Afghanistan had after U.S.-led forces drove the Taliban from power in the country in 2004. As it turns out, the Afghanistan Geological Survey staff had kept Soviet geological maps and reports up to 50 years old or more that hinted at a geological gold mine. http://news.yahoo.com/1-trillion-trove-rare-minerals-revealed-under-afghanistan-114520215.html
https://wn.com/Wow_1_Trillion_Trove_Of_'Rare_Minerals'_Revealed_Under_Afghanistan
13 Rarest Gemstones and Minerals Ever Seen

13 Rarest Gemstones and Minerals Ever Seen

  • Order:
  • Duration: 8:08
  • Updated: 05 Oct 2016
  • views: 1064846
videos
Here are the 13 most rare and valuable gemstones and minerals ever seen in the world like the blye Benitoite and red diamonds! Subscribe for new videos Monday Wednesday and Friday! 8. Jeremejevite This mineral was discovered way back in 1883 by a French mineralogist named Augustin Alexis Damour, who named it after the Russian scientist Pavel Vladimirovich Eremeev. The crystal was found on Mt. Soktui in Siberia, Russia. Since then, it has been described as being found in the Eifel District of Germany and in the Pamir Mountains in Namibia. This rare aluminum borate mineral is comprised of variable hydroxide and fluoride ions. 7. Poudretteite This mineral was first found during the mid-1960’s in the Poudrette quarry of Mont Saint-Hilaire, Quebec. However, it wasn’t until 1987 that the poudretteite was fully recognized as a new mineral. Even then, this mineral wasn't described in depth until 2003. As stated by several different sources, it’s believed that only a relative few will ever come into contact with this mineral and let alone ever even hear it mentioned. 6. Grandidierite This is considered to be an extremely rare mineral and gem that was first seen in 1902 on the Island of Madagascar. It was named in honor after the French explorer Alfred Grandidier who once studied the island’s natural history. Grandidierite comes in a bluish-green color and is located almost entirely in Madagascar, although, there was a clean faceted sample that was found in Sri Lanka. Grandidierite is also pleochroic, which means it's able to absorb different wavelengths of light differently and that results in different colors, such is the same ability with the gems tanzanite and alexandrite. 5. Painite This gemstone was first discovered back in the 1950’s in Myanmar by a British mineralogist named Arthur C. D. Pain. For the next several decades only two fragments of the hexagonal mineral were known to exist on earth. By the time the year 2005 rolled around, there were still less than 25 discovered pieces of painite and The Guinness Book of World Records had declared it the world's rarest gemstone mineral. However, that was 11 years ago and since then the origin of the original stones has been found, along with two other major locations that have led to the discovery of thousands of small samples of painite fragments. Even so, they’re still considered one of the world’s rarest minerals. 4. Red Beryl Also known as bixbite, "red emerald", or "scarlet emerald", red beryl was first reported as far back as 1904. Even though its chemical compound is closely similar to that of aquamarines and emeralds, it’s actually considered to be rarer than both of them. What gives the mineral its red color palette is thanks to the presence of ManganeseⅢ+ ions. It can be found in parts of New Mexico and Utah where it’s actually proven to be quite difficult to mine. Because of this, prices for red beryl are known to reach high levels and have even gone on to be around 10,000 per karat for stones. 3. Ammolite This rare gemstone can be found mainly in the eastern region of the Rocky Mountains of North America. Ammolite is an opal-like gemstone that is solely made up of the fossilized shells of extinct animals known as ammonites. This makes ammolite one of the few biogenic gemstones that exist, along with pearls and amber. Ammolites weren’t officially recognized as gemstones until 1981 when they were given official status by the World Jewellery Confederation. That’s also the same year that commercial mining for ammolite began. 2. Tanzanite It’s been said that tanzanite is 1,000 times rarer than a diamond, which might as well be the case considering the fact that it can be found almost entirely near the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro. This is where the perfect conditions lie in order to form the mineral. Like grandidierite, tanzanite is able to produce striking shifts in color based on the crystal’s orientation and the certain lighting conditions. Caltech's geology division states this is because the color variations are caused by the existence of vanadium ions. 1. Red Diamonds Did you know that diamonds come in a variety of colors? In fact, diamonds can range from being yellow, brown, colorless, blue, green, black, pink, orange, and red. That’s also the same order of how rare each diamond is classified as with yellow being the least and red being the most. Not only that but diamonds are also the hardest natural substances that form here on earth. Just like the colorless diamond, the red diamond is made purely out of carbon, however, what gives the diamond its red color is actually a deformation of their atomic structure that’s known as a “plastic deformation”. The Moussaieff Red is the largest red diamond in the world among the little known other red diamonds that have been discovered.
https://wn.com/13_Rarest_Gemstones_And_Minerals_Ever_Seen
Rare Earth Elements

Rare Earth Elements

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:16
  • Updated: 28 Feb 2012
  • views: 731804
videos
Hank reveals why our love affair with the rare earth elements has a dark side. Like SciShow on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Follow SciShow on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow References: http://washingtonindependent.com/101462/california-mine-represents-hope-... http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/09/business/energy-environment/09rare.htm... http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/commodity/rare_earths/
https://wn.com/Rare_Earth_Elements
Iridium - The MOST RARE Metal on Earth!

Iridium - The MOST RARE Metal on Earth!

  • Order:
  • Duration: 4:51
  • Updated: 10 Dec 2016
  • views: 1799310
videos
Chemical Elements: http://www.ebay.com /usr/novaelementscom?_trksid=p2047675.l2559 NOVAELEMENTS: https://www.novaelements.com/ Mel Science chemical sets: https://goo.gl/SxwFlQ Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Thoisoi?ty=h Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thoisoi2 Interesting page about chemical experiments: http://m.chemicum.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/thoisoi/ So today I will tell you about the most rare metal on Earth - iridium. Iridium is a transitional metal, which is located in the middle of the periodic table, below rhodium. If we take a look at the prevalence of all elements in the earth's crust, Iridium holds the last place, that is a billion atoms of all that there is and only one atom of iridium. This metal is 40 times rarer than gold. In much higher concentrations iridium is found in meteorites and also in the depths of the Earth, in magma. Interestingly enough, in the layers of rock sediments, though more precisely in the formation of clay, that is aged about 66 million years there were found high concentrations of iridium and this can indicate the collision of Earth with a huge meteorite in the past, which in theory was the cause of the death of the dinosaurs. In it’s appearance iridium is a shiny metal that does not oxidize in air. This metal has almost the highest density of all metals, just 0.12% lower than that of osmium - the most dense metal. In this tiny tiny metal droplet, which is of the size of a match head, we have 1 gram of iridium. To help you understand how high is the density of iridium, I will show other metals with the same mass for comparison. Lead, copper, gallium, zinc, magnesium, and the lightest metal - lithium. The volumes of the first and last metal differ by about 30 times, although their mass is the same. Iridium is also a very hard metal that is firmer than the solid steel in 1.5 (one and a half) times. Iridium, in addition to its rarity is even the most stable metal that does not oxidize in air up to 2000 degrees, and is not soluble in either acid or aqua regia. Iridium can only react with the fluorine at temperatures of about 600 degrees. Unfortunately, due to the low activity of iridium, I cannot conduct any chemical experiments or have quality reactions with it. The only thing that I can do is make a fine powder of iridium and set it on fire in the air, but as you can see, in this case iridium dust is burning quite slowly and also requires dispersing it in the air. For the first time on youtube, you can observe a burning iridium. Also, due to the low activity of iridium, the metal does not tarnish in air, even when heated to above 1,000 degrees. The only thing that the drop of iridium got covered with is a partially evaporated ceramic layer, the one that the forceps are made from. Iridium compounds are can be either brown or yellow, such as the complex of Vasca, which is used as a catalyst in organic chemistry. By the way, Iridium is the only element that can give away 9 electrons and form compounds with +9 (plus nine) oxidation state. Iridium now finds many uses in science and technology. In most cases, we will probably find iridium in spark plugs for vehicles, due to the high stability of iridium to oxidation under the influence of electric discharge. Pure iridium is used for making crucibles for growing single crystals, foil for making non-amalgam cathodes, as well as as a part of the highly resistant to corrosion alloys. The first standard of mass of one kilogram was created in 1889 using an alloy composition of 90% platinum and 10% iridium and is called the International Prototype Kilogram, it is still kept in the Paris Chamber of Weights and Measures. Now you know more about one more of the elements, if you would like the scientific series of the elements to continue, please subscribe to my channel and also throw in some likes if you can! Thank you for watching.
https://wn.com/Iridium_The_Most_Rare_Metal_On_Earth
China's Monopoly on Rare Earth Minerals to Diminish

China's Monopoly on Rare Earth Minerals to Diminish

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:41
  • Updated: 17 Aug 2011
  • views: 14785
videos
For more news visit ☛ http://english.ntdtv.com Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://facebook.com/NTDTelevision China currently produces the vast majority of the worlds rare-earth minerals - a group of 17 elements essential for a range of modern technology. However, China's monopoly on supply of these minerals could be about to change. China's current monopoly as a supplier of rare-earth metals is likely to change in the next couple of years, according to a new report, with new rare-earth mines opening in Western Australia and California. For years, China has produced at least 90 percent of rare earth metals and restricted exports, driving prices even higher. Some Japanese companies have moved to China to ensure supply of rare earth metals for production of their technologies, according to an article in the newspaper The Australian. The article refers to a report published yesterday by Gareth Hutch, a rare metals expert from Illinois, who predicts that the global percentage of rare earth metals supplied by China will drop significantly in the next six years. The group of 17 rare elements includes europium, which is used to produce the red color in televisions. Europium sold for $720 per kg at the start of 2011 and has since risen to $6,300 per kg. Harth predicts that China's share of the world market of europium will drop to 76 percent in two years and 37 percent in six years. He predicts a similar story for other rare earth metals.
https://wn.com/China's_Monopoly_On_Rare_Earth_Minerals_To_Diminish
Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble

Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble

  • Order:
  • Duration: 5:06
  • Updated: 14 Dec 2010
  • views: 895
videos
Rare Earth Mining Stocks in a Bubble
https://wn.com/Rare_Earth_Mining_Stocks_In_A_Bubble
Increasing Scarcity of Earth's Rare Materials

Increasing Scarcity of Earth's Rare Materials

  • Order:
  • Duration: 1:07
  • Updated: 20 Mar 2014
  • views: 1194
videos
According to studies that factored the percentage of a material in the Earth's crust and the importance it has to modern society, rhodium is among the rarest elements, along with gold, platinum and tellurium. One estimated projection from China, which produces over 90 percent of the world's rare earth metals, says that their mines for metals like platinum will not be able to keep up with demand in 15 years, and silver demand will overcome supply in 20 years. Have you ever wondered what the rarest material in the world is? According to studies that factored the percentage of a material in the Earth's crust and the importance it has to modern society, rhodium is among the rarest elements, along with gold, platinum and tellurium. One estimated projection from China, which produces over 90 percent of the world's rare earth metals, says that their mines for metals like platinum will not be able to keep up with demand in 15 years, and silver demand will overcome supply in 20 years. Other rare earth elements that are used in small amounts to power personal electronic devices like cellphones, laptop computers, tablets, and also electronic medical equipment could also become scarcer. Lawrence Meinert, program coordinator of the US Geological Survey's Mineral Resources Program is quoted as saying: "As supply and demand change, prices change and people adapt what they need and how they use it. This means that you can never consume everything because the price gets so high you stop using it." Other experts agree that although these materials might become less available due to a number of factors including political conflicts and mining feasibility, there is no way to say definitively if they have run out. ----------------------
https://wn.com/Increasing_Scarcity_Of_Earth's_Rare_Materials
60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

60 Minutes Highlights Importance of Rare Earth Elements

  • Order:
  • Duration: 12:55
  • Updated: 23 Mar 2015
  • views: 33570
videos
On March 22, 2015, 60 Minutes featured a segment on the importance of rare earth elements and underscored the need to ensure a domestic supply chain of these critical minerals moving forward.
https://wn.com/60_Minutes_Highlights_Importance_Of_Rare_Earth_Elements